274 E. Innis Ave.

Columbus, Oh 43207


  • AOH Business Meetings - 1st Thursday of every month at 7:00pm  (Open to Public) 
  • General AOH Meetings - 2nd Thursday of every month at 7:00pm (Open to Members Only)

Copyright © Ancient Order of Hibernians Patrick Pearse Division Columbus, Oh #1. All rights reserved.

Website design by Amanda Prior of AP Photography & Design 

Any questions or concerns regarding this website please contact pearsewebchairman@yahoo.com

"The Rebel"
And now I speak, being full of vision;
I speak to my people, and I speak in my people's name to the masters of my people.
I say to my people that they are holy, that they are august, despite their chains,
That they are greater than those that hold them, and stronger and purer,
That they have but need of courage, and to call on the name of their God,
God the unforgetting, the dear God that loves the peoples
For whom He died naked, suffering shame.
And I say to my people's masters: Beware,
Beware of the thing that is coming, beware of the risen people,
Who shall take what ye would not give. Did ye think to conquer the people,
Or that Law is stronger than life and than men's desire to be free?
We will try it out with you, ye that have harried and held,
Ye that have bullied and bribed, tyrants, hypocrites, liars!

​​Division History - The Early History of the AOH in Columbus OhioIt was in the autumn of 1875 when a small but determined group of Irishmen moved to Columbus, Ohio from Sharon and Wheatland, Pennsylvania. They settled in the part of Columbus known as "Flytown,"; which was located in the northwest section of Ohio's capital city. These men decided to bring the Ancient Order of Hibernians to Columbus.  After several preliminary meetings, many of them held under the shade of the trees in Goodale Park the first division of the Ancient Order of Hibernians, in Franklin County, was organized in March 1876. The Ohio State President, Peter Dumphey of Cincinnati, came to Columbus to install the division and its officers. The installation meeting was held in the Sessions Building located at 118-120 North High Street on the southeast corner of Long and High Sts. (the building, known as the Sessions Bank Block, was torn down in 1923). The first officers of the new divisions were as follows: Peter Heenahan, County Delegate ~ John Flynn, Division President ~ John J. Cook, Vice-President ~ Patrick Shea, Treasurer ~ Patrick Kilcoyne, Financial Secretary ~ John Duffy, Recording Secretary. The division grew and...READ MORE

Patrick Henry Pearse, educator, writer, poet, and revolutionary, was born on November 10, 1879 at 27 Great Brunswick Street, Dublin, Ireland. His English father, James Pearse, was a stone carver who had moved to Ireland hoping to find more work in his trade. His mother, Margaret Brady Pearse, was a native of County Meath, Ireland. Stonework was plentiful for James Pearse and the family, although not wealthy, managed to maintain a decent middle class life style. Patrick, named for American patriot Patrick Henry, was one of four children born to James and Margaret.

Patrick was educated at the Christian Brothers School in Westland Row, Dublin. He went on to study law at Royal University, graduating as a lawyer, but he soon abandoned the legal profession for a more satisfying career. Largely through the influence of his Irish aunt, Patrick was drawn to the history, myths and stories of ancient Ireland. He developed a deep interest in the Irish Language. He became a fluent Irish speaker. Pearse began teaching Irish at the Christian Brothers School and at the Jesuit University College in Dublin (one of his pupils for a time was a young James Joyce). Pearse joined Douglas Hyde and Eoin MacNeill in the Gaelic League in 1895 and in 1903 he became the editor of its newspaper An Claidheamh Soluis (The Sword of Light), a position he held for six years. During these years Pearse began to take an interest in the education system of Ireland and he came to see the teaching of children as the way forward not only for the Irish Language but for the whole Irish cultural and political scene of....READ MORE

I am Ireland:
I am older than the Old Woman of Beare.
Great my glory:
I that bore Cuchulainn the valiant.
Great my shame:
My own children that sold their mother.
I am Ireland:
I am lonelier than the Old Woman of Beare.
by: Patrick Pearse

Slainte! Cead mile Failte! Welcome!
Established in 1982, Tara Hall is the Social Outreach for the Ancient Order of Hibernians in Columbus Ohio. We are an Irish Catholic cultural organization dedicated to a united Ireland, the memory of St. Patrick, Patrick Pearse, Irish Music, Culture & Heritage. The Hall is located at 274 East Innis at the corner of 8th Street in the heart of Hungarian Village on the South Side of Columbus between the major streets of High Street (US 23) & Parsons Ave. Join us on Fridays for HAPPY HOUR and live Irish music! 

National History
The Ancient Order of Hibernians is the oldest Catholic lay organization in the United States. The fraternal Order traces its roots back to a parent organization that has existed in Ireland for over 400 years. Although the name Ancient Order of Hibernians can only be traced back to 1641, the Order claims continuity of membership and motto (Friendship, Unity and Christian Charity) unbroken to the Defenders of 1565. The Order evolved from a need in the late 1500s to protect the lives of Catholic priests. These priests faced immediate death for keeping the Catholic faith and sacraments alive in occupied Ireland...